Tag Archives: ames jeans

achievement unlocked: Cashmerette Ames jeans

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I made three pairs of jeans in two weeks for my Pattern Throwdown post over on the Curvy Sewing Collective blog back in February, & the most successful of the bunch was the Cashmerette Ames jeans. When this pattern was first released, I fully intended to give it a miss, as I already had the Closet Case Ginger jeans pattern & the Itch to Stitch Liana jeans pattern (won during an Indie Pattern Month challenge over on the Monthly Stitch, but not sewn until the Pattern Throwdown). I am within the Cashmerette size range, but on the smaller end, & although I often have to make fitting alterations to straight-sized patterns, I fit into the upper reaches of most brands. So, for me, Cashmerette patterns are an option but not really a necessity. & to be honest, I wasn’t especially impressed by the sample jeans photographed for the release. I felt that both samples fit their models poorly, & whenever the sample garment shows fitting issues, I become skeptical of the pattern as a whole. If I’m shelling out premium indie pattern prices, I expect the designer to go above & beyond to make the sample garments reflective of the actual intended fit & style of the design. (Rightly or wrongly, I tend to give more of a pass to Big 4 patterns, both because I pretty much exclusively buy them on sale, & because I know those patterns are professional designed & graded by people with legit industry training–which doesn’t mean mistakes never happen, but I do find those patterns generally more trustworthy than the output of people who draft for themselves & then use basic vector programs for their grading…Anyway…)

I bought this pattern with my own money, specifically for the Pattern Throwdown. If memory serves, I made a straight size 18. I chose the pear hip for reasons that are now inexplicable to me. I do not now & have never had a pear body type. I think the pattern guidelines on choosing your preferred pelvis shape said something about how the pear fit might be best for people who experience a lot of waistband gaping, & that is always a big problem for me with pants. But I am obviously an apple shape. I just tend to get waistband gaping because my waist is pretty narrow from the back. Most of my waist measurement is in the front.

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I did end up shaving some excess fabric off the side seams at the hips after doing a basted fitting, & when I make this pattern again, I will use the apple pelvis, & possibly even grade down to a size 16 in the hips. I will also add maybe another inch to the inseam because the drafted 30″ looks just a little bit short on me. I feel like I am showing just a little bit too much sock at the ankle. Maybe I’ll try wearing them rolled up for a more intentionally cropped look & see how I feel about that.

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A word about inseams: I read A LOT of sewing blogs & I often see people writing things like, “I’m only 5’2″ so I had to shorten the pants 3 inches,” or, “This designer drafts for someone who is 5’8″, so if you’re shorter/taller, bear that in mind.”

Obviously, inseam CAN be correlated to height, but it has a lot more to do with proportions. I’m 5’5″ & Jared is 5’10”. & yet, my inseam is actually 1″ longer than his. I have unusually long legs & he has an unusually long torso. This is why I generally ignore whatever height a pattern is supposedly drafted for & make decisions based on my measurements & on flat pattern measurements. That means an inseam of 31″ for full-length pants (my legs are literally about 2/3 of my body). For skirts & dresses, I like a finished length of 23″ or 24″, waist to hem, which hits just above the knee.

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Anyway. Aside from those minor tweaks, this pattern fit me astonishingly well right out of the envelope. I specifically followed the pattern directions for all the construction in order to give a fair & accurate pattern review for the Throwdown, knowing that the post would be read by a lot of people who have never made jeans before & would be looking for a pattern with reliable, easy-to-follow instructions. & this pattern really nailed it. I think it has the clearest, more comprehensible instructions for doing a classic zipper fly that I have yet seen. All of the pattern pieces came together really nicely, including the pocket stays. (I’ve had issues with other patterns where the stays are too long & get in the way of the fly, or where they are oddly-shaped, or unnecessarily fussy in their construction.) The pattern accommodates certain curvy/plus fit challenges in its drafting, with a contoured waistband & a built-in full tummy adjustment. The pockets were well-proportioned & the fly was the perfect length for a classic mid-rise style–not too long, not too short.

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I made the straight leg version, & I do think the legs turned out maybe just a hair on the skinny side. But I also sized down in the legs from a size 18 to a 16, so maybe that’s on me. I personally don’t mind the fit of the legs (aside from wishing I had just a little extra length), but a lot of people on my Pattern Throwdown post commented that the leg silhouette looked more skinny than straight.

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I cross stitched the back pockets using a pattern I bought from Little Plastic Covers on Etsy. I adapted the font from that pattern into the extra letters I needed to spell “killjoy” & omitted the floral motifs because I just didn’t have time to complete them before the deadline for the Curvy Sewing Collective. I made a pair of corduroy Gingers using the same pattern last year, but they have a leg-twisting problem & are just too tight for my current size (I made them when I was in the middle of my cancer treatments & thus a little smaller because I wasn’t eating much). So I’m glad these turned out so well, allowing me to broadcast my feminist killjoy status far & wide!